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FIFA World Cup 2018 shared a post.

FIFA World Cup 2018 shared a post.

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The Rules of Rugby

The game of Rugby, has had its rules changed and evolved so many times through out the years that it now is very different from what it started out as but if you do decide to come out and ever watch a game of Rugby you will be wondering what the hell is going on…so here are the basics of Rugby.

Rugby is a game played in 2, 40 minute halves, with a 10 minute halftime break. Each team has 15 players and is allowed 7 substitutes. The positions are as follows:

* 2 Props

* Hooker

* 2 Lockers

* 2 Flankers

* 8th Man

* Scrum-half

* Fly-half

* 2 Side Wings

* 2 Centers

* Fullback

The field that rugby is played on is called the Pitch. It is a grassy field 70 meters wide by 100 meters long and separated equally into two equal halves by a white line.

Scoring is done in one of 5 ways.

* Try

When a player touches the ball to the ground in the opponents in-goal area his team is awarded 5 points.

* Penalty Try

A player can attempt a penalty when a player would have scored a Try but was stopped by an opponents penalty. This is worth 5 points.

* Conversion Goal

Conversion goal is attempted after a team scores a Try, a conversion goal is worth 2 points.

* Penalty

Whenever a penalty is called the team who the penalty was called on gets to try for a penalty kick. If the kick is made that team gets 3 points.

* Dropped Goal

A dropped goal is when a players runs the ball back after a drop kick during the games general play.

General Game Play

Just like in American Football rugby starts off with kick off which is referred to as a drop kick.

Unlike American football however, their are no downs, no 10 yards to get, the game is continuous. The play does not stop when the ball hits the ground it is fair game. passing is allowed but it must either be done laterally or backwards, forward passing is not allowed. However any player may kick the ball at any time, and once the ball has been kicked it is up for grabs from either side. players often use this method to get the ball down field to team mates. Players may also run the ball until 1 of 2 things happen either they are tackled or they step out of bounds.

When a player steps out of bounds it is brought back into play by a method called “line out”, both teams line up 1 meter from each other in parallel lines and a player from the side that didn’t put the ball out of play throws it in a straight line between the two teams.

When a player is tackled the other method of bringing the ball back into play is called “scrum”, this is done by each team forming a tunnel and the ball is placed in between them, each side must battle for the ball against the other teams line until a player is able to push the ball backwards with his feet to his teammates behind him in the “tunnel”. If you’ve been thinking this sounds a lot like American football, well it is, it was the forerunner to the American Football’s “line of scrimmage”.

And thats it, the basics of rugby, so go out there and play!!

Camisetas de fútbol

All About Soccer Balls

There are a variety of things to consider when buying a soccer ball. The size of the ball varies with the different league standards and age groups. Therefore it is important to check the specific soccer league rules to make sure the ball matches a particular organization.

Different size and weight

A soccer ball is categorized by size and weight to make sure it is appropriate for the age group playing the game. A Size 3 (11 to 12 oz in weight and 23 to 24 inch in circumference) and size 4 (12 to 13 oz and 25 to 26 inch) soccer ball is preferred for the youths and children aged 13 or less. A size 5 (14 to 16 oz and 27 to 28 inch) ball is a standardized adult ball and used in professional soccer leagues, collegiate, and high school.

Care & Maintenance

General care and maintenance of the soccer ball is certain to help extend its usable life. Avoid putting excessive stress on the ball like standing or sitting on it. This can easily damage the pressure system and warp the shape or structure. It helps to avoid kicking the ball against a hard surface like a concrete wall. Also, avoid player a game of kick about on a rocky or rough surface like asphalt or gravel. This can easily lead to abrasion or puncturing.

Pressure Ratings

A regular inspection of the pressure rating is certain to help maintain the performance of the soccer ball. A ball needs to be maintained with the proper pressure that is not too firm, and not too soft. A ball over inflated is too hard and can cause injuries to the players. A low inflated ball isn’t likely to roll or bounce properly, which can make passing and controlling the ball more difficult. Ideally, a soccer ball should have a pressure range of 6 to 8-lbs. Most balls state the preferred rating on the outer skin.

Cleaning

A soccer ball played on an outside pitch needs a regular clean to avoid issues with water absorption and general deterioration. A ball cleaned with a mild soap and warm water is certain to help preserve its performance. Avoid using a harsh cleaner agent since this can damage the construction material. Also, make sure to store the ball correctly. Avoid leave it in a place with very low temperatures, in direct sunlight, or heavy rain. Any of these conditions can result in warping and water retention.

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Soccer Trivia and Facts

There’s nothing like a little bit of trivia to test your knowledge of the sport of soccer. You may say that soccer is your favorite sport, but how much do you really know? Following are some facts and tidbits that you may or may not know about soccer.

· Soccer originated generally in its present form in Britain.

· The world’s oldest club formed in 1857 is Sheffield FC

· Soccer is the most played and most watched sport on Earth

· Soccer is called football in practically every country except America, who call ‘Grid Iron’ football and football soccer.

· Famous soccer rivalries include the Old Firm (Scotland), Manchester derby, London derbies, Milan derby, Real vs Barcelona, and many more.

· Some famous soccer players: Pele, Maradonna, Charlton, Eusebio, Cruyff, Dalglish, Ronaldo, Beckham, Mattheus.

Those are some basic bits of soccer trivia and facts. How much did you know? Well, here are so more soccer facts to test your knowledge:

· The sport of Association Football (often referred to as soccer or simply football) is the most popular team sport in the world, in both number of spectators and number of active participants.

· The largest attendance for a soccer match ever was 199,854 people – Brazil v. Uruguay in the World Cup at the Maracana Municipal Stadium, Rio de Janeiro, July 1950.

· In the largest soccer tournament ever, no less than 5,098 teams competed in 1999 for the second Bangkok League Seven-a-Side Competition. Over 35,000 players involved!

· The most goals scored by one player in a single soccer match was 16

– Stephan Stanis (France) playing for Racing Club de Lens in December 1942.

· Based on video evidence, one of the fastest ever scored was in 2.8 seconds by Ricardo Olivera (Uruguay) in December 1998.

· The international governing body of soccer is the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), based in Zurich, Switzerland.

· Diego Maradona was only 16 when he made his soccer debut for Argentina.

· Soccer goalies didn’t have to wear different coloured shirts from their teammates until 1913.

· Eusebio scored 46 goals in the European Cup for Benfica.

· Chris Woods once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal while at Rangers, from between November 26 1986 and January 31 1987.

· Ryan Giggs’ dad was a professional Rugby League player.

· In 1973, the entire Galilee team spent the night in jail for kicking their opponents during an Israeli League game.

Have you had enough soccer trivia and facts? These are only a few of the interesting soccer facts that are floating around out there.

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France v Argentina – 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ – Match 50

France v Argentina – 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ – Match 50

replicas camisetas de futbol 2018

The Club World Cup Has Lost Its Purpose

The FIFA Club World Cup is no longer a proper measure to decide the best club team in the world.

Because of huge investments in European soccer in the last decade the European clubs (UEFA) have a big money advantage over the rest of the world and can buy the best players which gives them a big advantage over the other confederations. Moreover, the format of the tournament is set to favor UEFA and South America (Conmebol) which is unfair to the other teams.

The problem is that the competition has failed to keep up with changes in the game and has therefore lost its relevance and purpose.

PURPOSE OF THE TOURNAMENT

The competition was started in 2000 (when it absorbed its predecessor the Intercontinental Cup) and was formed as a yearly competition to showcase the best local talent from the various confederations. The idea was that the winners in each continental tournament would compete against each other and the winner crowned as the best club team in the world. This was the theory but in practice it has turned out differently.

Previously the best non-European players pursued their careers in their home countries and were unknown to foreign audiences. The Club World Cup gave these players a chance to showcase their skills on the world stage and at that time there was parity between clubs in Europe and South America.

Conmebol teams won the trophy in the first three years of the competition but after that the European teams dominated and the balance of power shifted to Europe.

DAVID vs GOLIATH

The beginning of European domination coincided in the early part of the current century with a massive influx of investment in UEFA soccer at club level. The fallout from this is that today there is a great disparity of income between European clubs and the other confederations.

The winner of the European Champions League earns much more money than the other continental tournaments combined. Real Madrid made $70.1 million last season for winning the UEFA Champions League. In contrast San Lorenzo made $6.1 million for winning Copa Libertadores (Conmebol), ES Setie made $1.8 million for winning the African (CAF) Champions League and in Asia Western Sydney Wanderers made about the same for defeating Saudi Arabia’s Al Hilal over two legs (YAHOO SPORTS – Why does the Club World Cup still struggle for relevance?; by Peter Staunton, December 12, 2014).

With such money on hand, the best talent that money can buy are in Europe’s major leagues, lured by the lucrative contracts that these leagues have to offer. This means that Europe has at its disposal its own talent and whatever the rest of the world has.

The biggest losers in the exodus of soccer talent to Europe are Brazil and Argentina which are the leading exporters of players, so what is Europe’s gain is South America’s loss.

Accordingly, every other side at the Club World Cup is at a disadvantage in comparison with Europe’s Champions League holder. The tournament has evolved from being a rivalry into a battle of David versus Goliath, between European clubs represented by what is tantamount to a World eleven made up mostly of the best international players and the minnows, comprising what is left over after the best of their talent have been siphoned off by the big UEFA clubs.

The current champion, Real Madrid, is a combination of some of the most expensive and best international players coming from Spain (Casillas and Sergio Ramos), France (Benzema and Varane), Portugal (Ronaldo and Pepe), Germany (Kroos), Brazil (Marcelo), Colombia (Rodriquez), Wales (Bale) and Mexico (Chicharito). This assembly of players is hardly representative of the local game in Spain. For three players, namely, Cristiano Ronaldo, Gareth Bale and James Rodriquez the club paid $367.8 million. Only twelve clubs in the world possess a squad of players whose market value is worth more than the total cost of these three.

Compare that to Auckland City FC one of its competitors in this year’s Club World Cup which is a team of mere amateurs having full-time occupations outside of soccer.

A look at some of the previous champions reveals the heavy foreign component of their squads. In 2010 when Inter Milan (Italy) won the cup, only 5 players in their squad of 23 were Italians while the rest were mostly from South America. Even the television commentators failed to keep up with the changes as they still referred to the Inter team as ‘the Italians’.

In 2011 Barcelona won the cup and 10 of their 23-man squad were from overseas.

BIZARRE FORMAT

Another big problem with the tournament is that teams from UEFA and South America are given a bye to the semi-finals and start playing even after some of the sides are eliminated. This is intentionally done so that only the biggest clubs face off in the final. So far only teams from those two continents have won and only one team from outside has made it to the final, namely, last year’s surprise finalist TP Mazembe, a Congolese side.

Given the money advantage enjoyed by UEFA and the bizarre format that is currently in place, the Club World Cup can hardly be called the fairest of competitions and the winner cannot legitimately be called ‘the best in the world’ anymore than the winners of the former Intercontinental Cup which was limited to UEFA and Conmebol. The tournament has lost its importance and is hardly bragworthy. Some years ago I won a dancing contest but the other contestants couldn’t dance, so was my victory something to brag about?

Some parity needs to be restored to the competition. Brazil and Argentina have started to raise wages in their local leagues to entice their players to remain at home. That is a start but in addition to that, FIFA must limit the number of foreign players available to each team to, say, two and change the format so that all competing teams play the same number of qualifying matches. Failing this, it is pointless to continue the competition in its present form.

Victor A. Dixon

December 23, 2014

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